This weeks digital campaign chatter #20


1. Dr Pepper – How do YOU drink Dr Pepper? (with deviantART)

Those of you familiar with deviantART will know it as a US founded peer-to-peer social network for roughly 18 million members, who upload and share their original artwork. Sift through the 80% of rubbish and you can usually find some real nuggets of artistic talent, ranging from the more traditional stuff, to films, digital, pixel and street art. So, where better for a brand who wants to be associated with being unique, fun and ‘different,’ to host a competition in order to crowdsource a mural design?

The contest ran over the summer, with the winner (above) recently being announced, and winning a trip to Brooklyn (USA) to see their mural for real, $3000, an iPad and some deviantART ‘perks’.

Over the three-week period 2105 entries were submitted, and entrants pushed their ideas via Facebook, Twitter etc. to the tune of around 15.9 million total impressions. Pretty good from a branding perspective for a relatively low-cost campaign! Also a great example of how going to where your target customers are already, as opposed to trying to create new online communities, is often the wisest route.

2. KLM – Live reply

I have said on several occasions how much I love how KLM have been using social platforms for marketing, branding, and customer services over the past couple of years. From their recent ‘design a tile’ campaign, to the ‘social experiment’ they did in 2010 which involved tracking down people who were tweeting whilst waiting for a KLM flight, and rewarding them before they boarded the flight with gifts, they just seem to understand the power of engagement and importance of understanding customers.

So, it’s nice to see that they are doing some ‘shouting out’ about their extraordinary knack of using social networks as effective customer service touch-points.  They already promise to reply to any message or tweet within an hour, but with their latest campaign, ‘live tweet’, they have taken things a step further!

Over the past couple of days they’ve replaced normal Facebook and Twitter responses with live video of 140 of their employees holding letters up and spelling out the responses! Not an easy task, but relatively cheap to do and a great PR stunt.

If you have not done so already, you should really check out their Facebook page for a perfect example of how brands SHOULD be using that platform as a customer service option. I really do love KLM!

3. Innocent – Tweet and Eat

The UK brand, Innocent, best known for their smoothies (and great marketing campaigns!), have developed a fab product launch idea, which incorporates Twitter and money-saving coupons available from their website.

The concept is simple but really nicely done. No doubt taking the lead from Groupon, and the power of the consumer, Innocent are offering money off their new Veg Pots, which will increase depending on how many people tweet about it using #tweetandeat: the more tweets, the bigger the discount. Simple genius!

You can sign up in order to be notified when the money off voucher is increased, and so stay a part of the campaign right the way through to the ‘free product’ option which they have set as the ultimate goal.

I would be really interested to see the figures on this campaign once it is complete. Is the cost of this approach worth it in respect of the amount of PR and WOM attention it gets, compared to the obvious losses incurred during product sales? Did they set a limit in order to keep control of the situation? Lots of questions around this approach, but at the end of the day, unless you try something like this you will never know the answers!

One thing they might want to consider if they are developing products outside of their usual smoothies however, is a change in their Twitter name: @innocentdrinks

Sony leads with digital to promote Wimbledon 3D


Working with Crayon, Sony have decided to lead with digital for the campaign to promote their 3D coverage of the Wimbledon finals this year – no TV support!  They’ve created a lovely video with viral-aspirations, and an online competition – bounc3d – which gives you the chance to win tons of Sony products, as well as tickets to watch the tennis in person.

bounc3d involves chasing virtual tennis balls across the internet and earning points depending on how many you catch. You get more points for sharing the campaign with your network (nice touch) and including it on your own websites.

The idea isn’t new – reminds me very much of the Magnum Pleasure Hunt which launched earlier on this year – but it’s been put together really nicely, and is actually quite fun to play (I need to get out more!).

The overall campaign includes the video, bounc3d competition microsite, Facebook, eCRM, radio & national press support, as well as field marketing of 10,000 branded tennis balls being handed out across London. Perhaps they should have gone for branded umbrellas instead – Wimbledon + England usually = rain afterall!

This weeks digital campaign chatter #10


1. Kelloggs Rice Krispie Squares – Find the Friend Who Isn’t

There are probably thousands of Facebook apps – some good, MOST bad – but why is it that the simple (and often cheesiest!) ones end up being the ones which draw you back again and again? I like to think of myself as (quite) an intelligent woman, yet I’m not sure that the cash prize was even needed as an incentive for me to play the latest campaign app by Kelloggs! It had me hooked within the first few seconds!

So, what’s it all about then? To play the game you simply have to find the profile picture from 49 which are given to you, which does NOT belong to one of your Facebook mates. You’ll get 3 second penalties for each time you choose wrong, and 3 chances to play each day. The fastest time of the week will get you £500, and the fastest time each day gets you lots of……you guessed it…..free Rice Krispie Squares!

There doesn’t appear to be much brand ‘positioning’ behind this campaign, which Sam Blunt, Kelloggs Consumer Promotions and Digital Controller says is “…a bit of lighthearted fun”, however, the data capture element makes me think that there may be some consumer intelligence and information gathering involved as part of it. Hopefully it will build their ‘likes’ up to something more worthwhile too.

It’s worth saying that they appear to have a very responsive team answering questions and wall posts, which is good to see. All too often brands invest in a campaign and forget to have sufficient resource to deal with the additional questions and engage with their ‘fans’.

2. The National Trust – My Farm

In an attempt to bring people closer with the realities of food production and farm life, The National Trust have launched a digital campaign which very much links in with real life.

Using a 60 second ad (above) to drive traffic to their website, they are hoping to encourage 10,000 participants to help with the running and decision-making of their farm, in Cambridgeshire. The website will be maintained by the farm ‘team’ and updated with video, blog posts etc. so that you can get a real feel for the day-to-day of farm life.

The one downfall – you have to pay £30 in order to join!

Whilst I think it is a great idea, the subscription model will be a real turn-off for most people, especially as you don’t appear to get much back in return. They’ll need to put a lot more work into driving traffic and subscriptions than just the ad alone – perhaps get some key influencers within their target user-groups interested and onboard?

However, as a long-term project it will be interesting to see how the engagement lasts with the people they do manage to get signed up. Maybe ‘crowdsourced farming’ will take off! Who knows!

3. Vodafone LG Optimus – Pixel Hunt

Unfortunately, this campaign website and game are no longer live so I am unable to add a link. However, after picking up on this great idea by Vodafone Germany on the Digital Buzz blog this week, I really wanted to share it!

To generate some buzz around the launch of the latest LG Optimus phone in Germany last November, Vodafone decided to emphasise how great the quality of the camera was, and create a game which involved finding 100 hidden phones within the pixels of a picture. Users could select one of the pixels in the picture on the campaign website in the hope of finding one of the free phones.

The results were fantastic. Over 300,000  people played the game and selected all of the 5 million pixels in under a month. Looks like there were strong links with Facebook to help boost the activity, but even so, those are pretty impressive results!

This weeks digital campaign chatter #1


Which digital campaigns have been talked about most this week?

1. Ken & Barbie Reunite

Still lots of talk about this campaign by Mattel Inc. which was launched a few weeks ago in honour of Kens 50th anniversary. Initially people were asked to vote if Barbie should take Ken back after their split on Valentines Day in 2004. Obviously the answer was ‘yes’, as they seem very much together now on the microsite.

This fantastic digital campaign included Barbie and Ken having their own Facebook and Twitter accounts, as well as profiles on the dating site Match.com! They also used Foursquare, YouTube, the main campaign microsite and a tie in with a US ‘Find the perfect boyfriend’ reality TV show to spread their message.

2. Visit Britain facebook app

VisitBritain has partnered with various travel organisations to launch their ‘Unite the Invite’ campaign, which targets people in the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. The Facebook app, created by Albion, cleverly ‘splits’ the participants virtual invitation to the UK in half and gives the other half to a different participant, who they then need to find using only a profile picture and the power of their own friendship groups and social networks. Very viral!

3. Jim Bean

To tie in with their TV ad, Jim Bean have launched a digital campaign which reinforces their message of ‘making a bold choice’. Via their Facebook or Twitter communities you can share your own bold decisions with the brand, as well access lots of video content and downloads.

Lineker goes viral for Cancer Research UK


Cancer Research UK do a great job online keeping their content informative and engaging at the same time. My guess is that they have no trouble getting people to connect initially, as Cancer is unfortunately one of those things that affects most of us one way or another at some point in our lives. However, keeping that interest and encouraging people to donate money is something that they definitely have to work hard at.

I especially like their latest Do Me A Favour campaign, which previewed on their Facebook page a few days ago, but officially launched today, and uses Gary Lineker to send personalised video messages. By giving information on the person you want to send a video to, such as their name, age, where they are from and favourite football team, a personalised message is created and emailed to them reminding them to check for any early signs and linking them into the main website at the end (see example below).

Although I don’t think you always need to use a celebrity in viral campaigns for them to work, in this case I think using Gary Lineker (and his wife!)  has worked really well and added enough interest for people to use it. They have also layered the supporting information well, with great visual tools which allow people to check the various early signs at different parts of the body, and tons of video content ranging from how to examine yourself, to interviews with people who have had various treatments.

It’s good to blog about not only a well created campaign, but also a worthy one too. Lets hope that they have lots of success with it.

#soirritating


There is a lot of talk in Digital Marketing ‘land’ at the moment about the recent campaign by US Shaving Gel ‘Edge’ where, similar to KLM’s Social Surprise Experiment, they offer random acts of kindness to users of Twitter in order to create a buzz around their brand.

Edge, owned by Energizer Holdings, have created an ‘Anti-Irritation Zone’ campaign (obvious brand tie-in to their product benefits) aimed at helping people with the everyday irritations of life.

In the beginning a small team literally read through thousands of tweets to find any where people mentioned being ticked off about something, and then selected ones which they could help with – such as sending the guy who had run out of cereal enough cereal to last him a very long time, and sending the woman who complained about having Spanish voices in her head a Spanish-English dictionary.

Since September they have sent out over 200 ‘anti-irritation’ gifts and the #soirritating hashtag has now grown into thousands of tweets by people desperate to be chosen (I am #soirritated that my car is not an Aston Martin, and #soirritated that I don’t own a private Caribbean Island).

“One of the top things is really resource commitment, and really understanding that in order to have the frequency and the level of engagement required to talk with people in a meaningful way, it takes time,”

explains Andrew Foote, senior vice president of Edelman Digital.

However, one thing that I find really ‘irritating’ about this whole campaign is their failure to focus on the basics. Their website is TERRIBLE! There is no mention at all of the campaign, and the flash interface is just really….well…irritating! Just goes to show that no matter how great the idea, you’ve got to sort out some basic housekeeping before doing anything else.

What they have done, however, is focus on key websites and blogs to advertise the campaign, and to create a sponsored area on the Funnyordie website where people can upload their own videos allowing them to publicly vent their frustrations. Nothing I could find on YouTube though, which is a little odd?

No denying that they have got a lot of people talking about them – I wonder how well it’s working in the US to sell more of their product and strengthen their brand?

Top 10 viral ads of 2010


There has been so much talk about the Old Spice video ad campaign this year, that it is no surprise to see it in the top slot of the Ad Age Top 10 Viral Ads of 2010. The interactive campaign, which posted cheesy but amusing video responses from their brand ‘hunk’ to consumer questions, gained over 68 million views in total from its launch in July, which is truly spectacular! In fact, the overall figures from this list are amazing in comparison to last year, with a combined figure of over 320 million views in comparison to 196 million for the top 10 in 2009. Is this a sign of the times (how consumers are living their lives more online), or an indication that companies are finally beginning to think more strategically when looking at their Digital Marketing and Online Branding?

1. Old Spice – Responses, launched 12th July 2010, over 68 million views

2. Old Spice – Odor Blocker, launched 31st March 2010, almost 42 million views

3. Doritos – Crash the Super Bowl 2010, launched 5th January 2010, over 36.5 million views

4. Old Spice (again!) – The man your man could smell like, launched 4th Feb 2010, over 36 million views

5. Nike – Write the Future, launched 15th May 2010, over 35 million views

6. DC Shoes – Gymkhana Three, launched 24th August 2010, over 22.5 million views

7. Old Spice – Return of the man your man could smell like, launched 29th June, almost 22.5 million views

8. Pepsi – Oh Africa, launched 27th Feb 2010, over 20 million views

9. Gillette – Perfect length, launched 19th June 2010, over 18.5 million views

10. E-Trade Superbowl 2010, launched 1st Feb 2010, almost 18.5 million views

If you were to ask me which was my favourite out of this list, my honest answer would be that I am not too keen on any of the video’s! There are far more creative video’s out there which in my opinion should have made the top 10. That’s just my personal taste though…..from a campaign point of view, Old Spice are undoubtedly the best. They have taken online video away from simply putting your TV ads on You Tube, and developed something much more interactive and fit for purpose. A well deserved win I reckon!