Febreze launch Global ‘Breathe Happy’ campaign


The latest integrated campaign by Proctor & Gambles $billion air freshener brand, Febreze, kick started last month in the US and is due to launch in the UK next week.

Following a (resurrected) current trend of using ‘real people’ video evidence to show how great a product is, the brand set up several ‘social experiments’ – such as bringing smelly fish, goats and sweaty bodybuilders into rooms with unsuspecting volunteers, or blindfolding people and leaving them in places which have been set up to resemble the aftermath of a nuclear war. Of course, Febreze was used to mask the pong and the people were asked to describe what they could smell and what it reminded them of.

No surprise that they smell the beautiful floral fragrance of Febreze, and not the smeg that it is masking, and that there are lots of dramatic gasps when they take off their blindfold to find themselves staring into the armpit of a bodybuilder, or face-to-face with a dead fish, and not in the middle of a beautiful meadow.

What is this telling us? That the smell of Febreze is so strong it can cover up anything? Actually, it is telling us that the team behind Febreze are starting to do some real joined-up thinking, and have developed a great campaign which will not only work well globally, but will also work across all of their marketing platforms.

The US have kick started the global campaign well, using a dedicated area of their main brand website, as well as active Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels. There is also a competition encouraging people to share their ‘breathe happy’ stories for the chance to win free product and/or money. It’s a shame they didn’t take this concept just a little further and allow people to recreate the experiments and then share the videos. Opening up the votes would have helped to make the campaign more interactive too.

Lets hope that the UK and other countries involved use the same formula as the US, although they will need to do a little work on the online brand consistency between the main websites in order to share the collateral and microsite design already developed. I always tell my clients to sort out global brand consistency asap – if the online branding is consistent, the cost savings when rolling out campaigns can be significant.

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This weeks digital campaign chatter #20


1. Dr Pepper – How do YOU drink Dr Pepper? (with deviantART)

Those of you familiar with deviantART will know it as a US founded peer-to-peer social network for roughly 18 million members, who upload and share their original artwork. Sift through the 80% of rubbish and you can usually find some real nuggets of artistic talent, ranging from the more traditional stuff, to films, digital, pixel and street art. So, where better for a brand who wants to be associated with being unique, fun and ‘different,’ to host a competition in order to crowdsource a mural design?

The contest ran over the summer, with the winner (above) recently being announced, and winning a trip to Brooklyn (USA) to see their mural for real, $3000, an iPad and some deviantART ‘perks’.

Over the three-week period 2105 entries were submitted, and entrants pushed their ideas via Facebook, Twitter etc. to the tune of around 15.9 million total impressions. Pretty good from a branding perspective for a relatively low-cost campaign! Also a great example of how going to where your target customers are already, as opposed to trying to create new online communities, is often the wisest route.

2. KLM – Live reply

I have said on several occasions how much I love how KLM have been using social platforms for marketing, branding, and customer services over the past couple of years. From their recent ‘design a tile’ campaign, to the ‘social experiment’ they did in 2010 which involved tracking down people who were tweeting whilst waiting for a KLM flight, and rewarding them before they boarded the flight with gifts, they just seem to understand the power of engagement and importance of understanding customers.

So, it’s nice to see that they are doing some ‘shouting out’ about their extraordinary knack of using social networks as effective customer service touch-points.  They already promise to reply to any message or tweet within an hour, but with their latest campaign, ‘live tweet’, they have taken things a step further!

Over the past couple of days they’ve replaced normal Facebook and Twitter responses with live video of 140 of their employees holding letters up and spelling out the responses! Not an easy task, but relatively cheap to do and a great PR stunt.

If you have not done so already, you should really check out their Facebook page for a perfect example of how brands SHOULD be using that platform as a customer service option. I really do love KLM!

3. Innocent – Tweet and Eat

The UK brand, Innocent, best known for their smoothies (and great marketing campaigns!), have developed a fab product launch idea, which incorporates Twitter and money-saving coupons available from their website.

The concept is simple but really nicely done. No doubt taking the lead from Groupon, and the power of the consumer, Innocent are offering money off their new Veg Pots, which will increase depending on how many people tweet about it using #tweetandeat: the more tweets, the bigger the discount. Simple genius!

You can sign up in order to be notified when the money off voucher is increased, and so stay a part of the campaign right the way through to the ‘free product’ option which they have set as the ultimate goal.

I would be really interested to see the figures on this campaign once it is complete. Is the cost of this approach worth it in respect of the amount of PR and WOM attention it gets, compared to the obvious losses incurred during product sales? Did they set a limit in order to keep control of the situation? Lots of questions around this approach, but at the end of the day, unless you try something like this you will never know the answers!

One thing they might want to consider if they are developing products outside of their usual smoothies however, is a change in their Twitter name: @innocentdrinks

This weeks digital campaign chatter #19


1. Coca Cola Israel – Summer LoveLove it or hate it, it’s interesting to see how the marketing world adapts to Facebook’s latest intrusions on their users private lives as they happen. This campaign by Publicis Israel for Coca Cola is a great example of making the most out of their new additions – although this ones not quite so new anymore!

A few weeks back Coke used a tie in with Face.com in order to help promote their run of concerts during a ‘Summer Love’ promotion. Party goers were able to log in to their Facebook accounts at special ‘pods’ using only their faces as identification. Think about how Facebooks facial recognition feature ‘suggests’ which of your friends  to tag when you upload pictures these days – that’s basically the inspiration behind the idea.

As people needed to sign up for the event online anyway, they included the registration for this service in the process, making it quicker and easier to sign in once you were actually at the concert.

Why sign in to Facebook when you are at a concert you may ask?  To tell everyone how great the concert is and how fantabulous Coca Cola are of course! Nice.

2. Topshop – Scvngr

In a bid to become the most digitally-savvy retailer in the UK, Topshop are at it again!  This time they have partnered with the successful US mobile gaming platform, Scvnger, in order to bring some fun and interaction opportunities to students as they head to/back to University.

Starting on 5th September, participants can download a bespoke Topshop/scvnger app which will allow them to take part in games and challenges in order to accumulate points and therefore win prizes. Tasks will include things like taking pictures of their favourite Topshop outfits, and finding items which match particular trends. Hopefully they will be using this product intelligence to feed future campaigns both online and offline – it would be a real shame if not!

Mary Homer, Topshop MD said:

Following the popularity of SCVNGR in the US we wanted to offer our student customers the ability to interact with our brand, on and off-line in a more fun and engaging way.

They’ve already planned for updated challenges to be launched in October with a view to keeping things fresh and interesting. Lets hope it works out for them. Certainly sounds like a great idea and a fun way to interact with customers. However, if you’ve got the posts left on Scvnger’s Facebook wall from irate business partners to go off, Topshop are going to have to be careful how they manage that relationship!

For more info on scvngr, check out this interesting interview with 21yr old founder Seth Prebatsch:

3. Volkswagen – Bluemotion Roulette

This fantastic integrated campaign by Volkswagen Norway shows how cross-platform done well can drive engagement and value. In this case Volkswagen wanted to emphasise the low fuel consumption of their new Golf Bluemotion car by making it less ‘abstract’ to consumers, and creating a memorable campaign which would not only drill home their key message, but would do it in an interactive and engaging way.

They used a TV ad to let people know about a game of roulette whereby you could go online and guess where the car would run out of fuel whilst driving a specific route. The E6 road in Norway was split into car-length chunks using google maps that people could select from on the website, and the event could then be viewed live online as it happened. Of course, the person who guessed right got the car.

It turns out that people really did their research on the car in order to gain best advantage from their one and only guess, which is great! I love this campaign! I’m guessing that it could have worked really well without the costly TV slots also, although probably not have driven as many people to the game as quickly. It would be great to see them follow things up with some online only games or competitions perhaps? I also wonder if this will be taken up by other countries? (i.e. I want a go!!!)

This weeks digital campaign chatter #17


As always, an interesting bunch of digital campaigns this week that you can learn from and feel inspired by. Personalised video cheers, chip-throwing Facebook games, and an Indian James Bond campaign. What more could you ask for?!

Enjoy! – and don’t forget to subscribe (bottom of page) if you want to receive this weekly round-up via email.

1. Aviva – Healthy Cheer

European insurance group Aviva have recently launched a digital campaign and Facebook app to tie in with their overall brand and marketing strategy, which is to encourage people to live a healthier lifestyle (and therefore them pay out less I guess!).

By ‘liking’ their Facebook page, you can send a friend a personalised video message featuring Aviva’s yellow-clad cheerleaders, to encourage them in their efforts to get fitter and healthier. It’s a nice and simple tried-and-tested viral video campaign concept – nothing complicated, but the idea of the virtual ‘cheer’ and the link with the brand messaging is good.

You send your friend an email with a link to their personalised video, they watch the video, they share the video (or in this case, the campaign – for some reason you cannot share you own personal video within your social networks, which is a shame), friend decides to create their own message for someone else, and so on and so forth.

It’s a shame they didn’t put more effort into their email notification to the nominated friends (see below) – looks very shabby and there are a couple of silly mistakes in the copy/layout.

It would also have been good to hear more about their chosen charity partner, Railway Children, to whom they will be donating £1 for each of the first 1000 video messages sent. Seems like a missed opportunity to both give the charity some awareness, as well as bump up their perceived CSR credentials!

No mention of the campaign on the homepage (or even main ‘Health’ page) of their website – tut tut! It could have been on there for launch I guess and I’ve missed it? It would also have been great to promote the additional health related content and tips they have available on the website via the campaign. Such an investment in quality content should be promoted and re-used wherever relevant in order to get maximum ROI from creating it in the first place. It would also have added a valuable extra layer to the social media campaign.

I’m also wondering what they are going to do with the cheerleader introduction videos and behind-the-scenes stuff which you can view on the dedicated YouTube channel? It would have been great to have this within their Facebook space, a little like Heineken did with The Entrance earlier on in the year.

So, overall verdict – a nice idea, fun, quirky, easy to use, but missing out on lots of possible added value opportunities which would have made the campaign even better.

2. Doritos – Dip Desperado

Doritos have launched an integrated campaign in the UK this week which centers around a new character – Esteban Ortega – and involves TV, Facebook, mobile and packaging promotion.

The TV ad (which aired last night) introduces Esteban as the ‘Dip Desperado’ and encourages viewers to play the Facebook or mobile game in order to win prizes, such as holidays and free products.

I didn’t quite get the hang of the game (nothing new there though!), but it seems to be about making your Doritos chip fly past lots of obstacles and collect bonus points on its way to the dip. You can register if you want to keep an eye on your scores etc., as well as input special codes from product packaging which will give you added advantage in the competition.

This is a nicely integrated campaign, where all aspects of online and offline tie-in and promote the competition – including their main website which has been completely taken over by it.

Always great to see organisations getting past the internal structures and politics to enable campaign promotion on product packaging too – never an easy thing to achieve. Well done guys!

3. Star Movies India – Forever Bond

To promote their Bond Film Festival throughout July, the Indian film channel Star Movies has launched an online digital campaign, which allows you to ‘play at being Bond’ (or so they say!)

If you access the campaign via their website, you get a nifty introduction to it by inputting your mobile phone number and getting a call from ‘M’ – which you obviously have to destroy once listened to! Unfortunately, I couldn’t try this step out as it appears to only accept numbers from India……

The game itself can be accessed via their Facebook page. Drag the ‘007’ button to your browser bookmark bar, and you can activate the game no matter which website you are on. Once activated the game menu appears and you get to drive an Aston Martin around the page, firing lasers and destroying all the copy and images along the way.

It’s a really nice idea, but is lacking any real incentive to play. It would have been much better if associated with a competition of some sort, giving people a reason to activate the game more often and more importantly, share it with their friends. At the moment, even with the Bond theme tune making you feel vaguely Bond-like, it still feels a little flat and pointless.

How cool would it have been to have the Bond ‘baddies’ appear every so often when you are browsing the web, giving you the opportunity to kill them and get points? Would have been a  nice reminder of the main characters from the films too.

Nice idea, but feels a little ‘stirred rather than shaken’ to me (sorry, couldn’t help myself!).

This weeks digital campaign chatter #16


Two quite different launch campaigns this week by phone companies for the newest HTC handsets. T-Mobile take an innovative approach using Google Goggles in the US, and Phones4u partner with New Look for their Facebook competition in the UK.

1. T-Mobile – HTC Sensation 4G launch

Now, here’s a blast from the past! Not the phone – obviously – or the new functions it offers, but rather the use of Google Goggles (which I had forgotten all about!) in the US ad campaign. Since it’s launch in 2009 it has been pretty quiet on the Google Goggles front – a simple ‘little’ tool which enables you to search based on pictures of landmarks, art, books, addresses or other objects taken directly from your mobile phone, and can even translate text (for example, from a menu in a different language) by taking a photo of it.

A little like QR codes, it seems that the marketing world have just not known how to use the tool, and are still experimenting (in very small numbers!) with how to make it work for them. This campaign for the new HTC Sensation 4G phone, however, seems like quite a clever use of the functionality.

People viewing any part of the integrated campaign – be that outdoor, TV or print – can take a picture using Google Goggles in order to access unique bonus content, such as music videos.

I love this idea of mobile interacting with other areas of a campaign, such as what Honda did with their Unpredictable Life app which allowed you to ‘catch’ characters from the TV ad and then interact with them on your phone. It will be interesting to see how many more brands start to use Google Goggles in this way after such a high-profile campaign.

2. Phones4u – HTC ChaCha/New Look Facebook Competition

Another HTC launch this week, this time in the UK, with a Facebook competition developed for Phones4u to promote the launch of the new look ChaCha.

Working with fashion retailers New Look, you need to ‘like’ the Phones4u page before entering the competition, which then requires you to add a password that can only be found on the back of changing room doors in New Look stores. Interesting idea to link offline with online in this way, and a great way of driving people to the Facebook page from stores – but what about the other way around? I went to the page expecting to find a competition, only to find that there was nothing I could do unless I had the password. Could have been worth looking at an alternative of some sort for users accessing the page (and therefore the competition) from a different route?

No mention of the competition anywhere on the main Phones4u site either – homepage or phone info pages………

This weeks digital campaign chatter #15


Some great campaigns from KLM, Perrier and Ballantines this week – all including user participation and interaction in interesting ways…..

1. KLM – Tile & Inspire

This week saw the completion of the latest global digital campaign by Dutch airline KLM. The Tile & Inspire campaign, which has been running since April, ties in with the ‘Journey’s of Inspiration’ brand message launched in 2008, and encourages participants to have a more ‘active’ role in their journey by becoming part of the planes decor!

Using a campaign micro-site and a Facebook app, the user was able to create an image of themselves in the style of a traditional Dutch Delft tile. This could then be shared with their social networks, replace their profile picture on Facebook, and be submitted to KLM to potentially be chosen as one of the 4000 tiles which would eventually decorate a Boeing 777-200.

120,000 tiles were created during the campaign in 154 countries, with 77,000 submitted for a place on the plane.

I am a fan of KLM’s approach to digital marketing, and loved their social ‘surprise’ experiment last year which saw them running after customers at Schipol airport who had tweeted whilst waiting to board one of their flights so they could give them a gift which matched their ‘personality’ (after checking out their twitter history big-brother-style).

Whilst checking out this campaign I was once again reminded of how BRILLIANT their social media team are. Just check out the fantastic responses to customer queries on their Facebook page for a great example of how one should be managed. Afterall, branding isn’t just about how things look, but more about the overall experience a person has when dealing with your company or organisation. More and more people are starting to use social media as a form of customer-service-queries-platform, and you need the right team to deal with this who understand EVERYTHING about your company, its products and its brand values.

2. Perrier – Le Club

Le Club by Perrier, is reportedly the first YouTube video campaign which evolves depending on how many people have viewed it.

Ogilvy and Mather Paris created 7 wonderful videos (or at least, 7 iterations of the same video) for the mineral water brand, depicting the scene in a trendy nightclub, with each version getting steamer and sweatier. The more views the video gets, the closer to unlocking the next ‘hotter’ version, with the final 7th (and hottest!) version being aired live at a ‘melting’ party in New York. Facebook fans can enter a competition to win tickets to this party, as well as encouraging their friends to visit YouTube and help get nearer to the ‘final take’.

The main Perrier website has been completely taken over by Le Club, driving people straight to YouTube from the landing page and virtually hiding the way into the more traditional content. This is great to see – I am always complaining about campaigns not being fully integrated into all digital assets.

This massive fully integrated campaign is also supported by TV, point-of-sale, print and mobile, and has so far notched up a staggering 5 million video views since launch. Obviously people are very keen to see beautiful people ‘de-robe’ a bit more!

3. Ballantines – Human api

Taking ‘crowdsourcing’ to a whole new level, Ballantines (whiskey) have created some new live events, accessed via Facebook, which enable you to interact, suggest and feedback as the event happens.

The first of these took place on the 16th June and featured a tattooist (Karl) – taking their ‘Leave an impression’ tagline a little too literally! You were able to see everything he was up to in his Parisian tattoo parlour, as he was seeing it, and talk to him (via messaging) along the way. The next in the series will feature an ice sculptor and take place on 30th June at 3pm (GMT).

Red Cross – donate your miles


Check out this fantastic concept for The Red Cross from Miami Ad School (Europe). The idea is that people would donate their free air miles to the Red Cross whenever they booked a flight, via an integrated donation link on the airlines/travel website. This would then lead them to a microsite, where they can connect with their social community to boast about their good deed, and encourage others to do the same. Genius!

I like the fact that you could also track your donated ‘miles’ and how they have been used via a mobile app, allowing the charity to start connecting more with the individual and therefore increase their chances of future donations.

Such a great idea, and the integration elements are really simple but well thought out. I do love the Miami Ad School!