This weeks digital campaign chatter #20


1. Dr Pepper – How do YOU drink Dr Pepper? (with deviantART)

Those of you familiar with deviantART will know it as a US founded peer-to-peer social network for roughly 18 million members, who upload and share their original artwork. Sift through the 80% of rubbish and you can usually find some real nuggets of artistic talent, ranging from the more traditional stuff, to films, digital, pixel and street art. So, where better for a brand who wants to be associated with being unique, fun and ‘different,’ to host a competition in order to crowdsource a mural design?

The contest ran over the summer, with the winner (above) recently being announced, and winning a trip to Brooklyn (USA) to see their mural for real, $3000, an iPad and some deviantART ‘perks’.

Over the three-week period 2105 entries were submitted, and entrants pushed their ideas via Facebook, Twitter etc. to the tune of around 15.9 million total impressions. Pretty good from a branding perspective for a relatively low-cost campaign! Also a great example of how going to where your target customers are already, as opposed to trying to create new online communities, is often the wisest route.

2. KLM – Live reply

I have said on several occasions how much I love how KLM have been using social platforms for marketing, branding, and customer services over the past couple of years. From their recent ‘design a tile’ campaign, to the ‘social experiment’ they did in 2010 which involved tracking down people who were tweeting whilst waiting for a KLM flight, and rewarding them before they boarded the flight with gifts, they just seem to understand the power of engagement and importance of understanding customers.

So, it’s nice to see that they are doing some ‘shouting out’ about their extraordinary knack of using social networks as effective customer service touch-points.  They already promise to reply to any message or tweet within an hour, but with their latest campaign, ‘live tweet’, they have taken things a step further!

Over the past couple of days they’ve replaced normal Facebook and Twitter responses with live video of 140 of their employees holding letters up and spelling out the responses! Not an easy task, but relatively cheap to do and a great PR stunt.

If you have not done so already, you should really check out their Facebook page for a perfect example of how brands SHOULD be using that platform as a customer service option. I really do love KLM!

3. Innocent – Tweet and Eat

The UK brand, Innocent, best known for their smoothies (and great marketing campaigns!), have developed a fab product launch idea, which incorporates Twitter and money-saving coupons available from their website.

The concept is simple but really nicely done. No doubt taking the lead from Groupon, and the power of the consumer, Innocent are offering money off their new Veg Pots, which will increase depending on how many people tweet about it using #tweetandeat: the more tweets, the bigger the discount. Simple genius!

You can sign up in order to be notified when the money off voucher is increased, and so stay a part of the campaign right the way through to the ‘free product’ option which they have set as the ultimate goal.

I would be really interested to see the figures on this campaign once it is complete. Is the cost of this approach worth it in respect of the amount of PR and WOM attention it gets, compared to the obvious losses incurred during product sales? Did they set a limit in order to keep control of the situation? Lots of questions around this approach, but at the end of the day, unless you try something like this you will never know the answers!

One thing they might want to consider if they are developing products outside of their usual smoothies however, is a change in their Twitter name: @innocentdrinks

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This weeks digital campaign chatter #15


Some great campaigns from KLM, Perrier and Ballantines this week – all including user participation and interaction in interesting ways…..

1. KLM – Tile & Inspire

This week saw the completion of the latest global digital campaign by Dutch airline KLM. The Tile & Inspire campaign, which has been running since April, ties in with the ‘Journey’s of Inspiration’ brand message launched in 2008, and encourages participants to have a more ‘active’ role in their journey by becoming part of the planes decor!

Using a campaign micro-site and a Facebook app, the user was able to create an image of themselves in the style of a traditional Dutch Delft tile. This could then be shared with their social networks, replace their profile picture on Facebook, and be submitted to KLM to potentially be chosen as one of the 4000 tiles which would eventually decorate a Boeing 777-200.

120,000 tiles were created during the campaign in 154 countries, with 77,000 submitted for a place on the plane.

I am a fan of KLM’s approach to digital marketing, and loved their social ‘surprise’ experiment last year which saw them running after customers at Schipol airport who had tweeted whilst waiting to board one of their flights so they could give them a gift which matched their ‘personality’ (after checking out their twitter history big-brother-style).

Whilst checking out this campaign I was once again reminded of how BRILLIANT their social media team are. Just check out the fantastic responses to customer queries on their Facebook page for a great example of how one should be managed. Afterall, branding isn’t just about how things look, but more about the overall experience a person has when dealing with your company or organisation. More and more people are starting to use social media as a form of customer-service-queries-platform, and you need the right team to deal with this who understand EVERYTHING about your company, its products and its brand values.

2. Perrier – Le Club

Le Club by Perrier, is reportedly the first YouTube video campaign which evolves depending on how many people have viewed it.

Ogilvy and Mather Paris created 7 wonderful videos (or at least, 7 iterations of the same video) for the mineral water brand, depicting the scene in a trendy nightclub, with each version getting steamer and sweatier. The more views the video gets, the closer to unlocking the next ‘hotter’ version, with the final 7th (and hottest!) version being aired live at a ‘melting’ party in New York. Facebook fans can enter a competition to win tickets to this party, as well as encouraging their friends to visit YouTube and help get nearer to the ‘final take’.

The main Perrier website has been completely taken over by Le Club, driving people straight to YouTube from the landing page and virtually hiding the way into the more traditional content. This is great to see – I am always complaining about campaigns not being fully integrated into all digital assets.

This massive fully integrated campaign is also supported by TV, point-of-sale, print and mobile, and has so far notched up a staggering 5 million video views since launch. Obviously people are very keen to see beautiful people ‘de-robe’ a bit more!

3. Ballantines – Human api

Taking ‘crowdsourcing’ to a whole new level, Ballantines (whiskey) have created some new live events, accessed via Facebook, which enable you to interact, suggest and feedback as the event happens.

The first of these took place on the 16th June and featured a tattooist (Karl) – taking their ‘Leave an impression’ tagline a little too literally! You were able to see everything he was up to in his Parisian tattoo parlour, as he was seeing it, and talk to him (via messaging) along the way. The next in the series will feature an ice sculptor and take place on 30th June at 3pm (GMT).

This weeks digital campaign chatter #10


1. Kelloggs Rice Krispie Squares – Find the Friend Who Isn’t

There are probably thousands of Facebook apps – some good, MOST bad – but why is it that the simple (and often cheesiest!) ones end up being the ones which draw you back again and again? I like to think of myself as (quite) an intelligent woman, yet I’m not sure that the cash prize was even needed as an incentive for me to play the latest campaign app by Kelloggs! It had me hooked within the first few seconds!

So, what’s it all about then? To play the game you simply have to find the profile picture from 49 which are given to you, which does NOT belong to one of your Facebook mates. You’ll get 3 second penalties for each time you choose wrong, and 3 chances to play each day. The fastest time of the week will get you £500, and the fastest time each day gets you lots of……you guessed it…..free Rice Krispie Squares!

There doesn’t appear to be much brand ‘positioning’ behind this campaign, which Sam Blunt, Kelloggs Consumer Promotions and Digital Controller says is “…a bit of lighthearted fun”, however, the data capture element makes me think that there may be some consumer intelligence and information gathering involved as part of it. Hopefully it will build their ‘likes’ up to something more worthwhile too.

It’s worth saying that they appear to have a very responsive team answering questions and wall posts, which is good to see. All too often brands invest in a campaign and forget to have sufficient resource to deal with the additional questions and engage with their ‘fans’.

2. The National Trust – My Farm

In an attempt to bring people closer with the realities of food production and farm life, The National Trust have launched a digital campaign which very much links in with real life.

Using a 60 second ad (above) to drive traffic to their website, they are hoping to encourage 10,000 participants to help with the running and decision-making of their farm, in Cambridgeshire. The website will be maintained by the farm ‘team’ and updated with video, blog posts etc. so that you can get a real feel for the day-to-day of farm life.

The one downfall – you have to pay £30 in order to join!

Whilst I think it is a great idea, the subscription model will be a real turn-off for most people, especially as you don’t appear to get much back in return. They’ll need to put a lot more work into driving traffic and subscriptions than just the ad alone – perhaps get some key influencers within their target user-groups interested and onboard?

However, as a long-term project it will be interesting to see how the engagement lasts with the people they do manage to get signed up. Maybe ‘crowdsourced farming’ will take off! Who knows!

3. Vodafone LG Optimus – Pixel Hunt

Unfortunately, this campaign website and game are no longer live so I am unable to add a link. However, after picking up on this great idea by Vodafone Germany on the Digital Buzz blog this week, I really wanted to share it!

To generate some buzz around the launch of the latest LG Optimus phone in Germany last November, Vodafone decided to emphasise how great the quality of the camera was, and create a game which involved finding 100 hidden phones within the pixels of a picture. Users could select one of the pixels in the picture on the campaign website in the hope of finding one of the free phones.

The results were fantastic. Over 300,000  people played the game and selected all of the 5 million pixels in under a month. Looks like there were strong links with Facebook to help boost the activity, but even so, those are pretty impressive results!

This weeks digital campaign chatter #8


Some of this weeks most talked about digital campaigns, including work from Orange, Kotex and Desperados.

1. Orange – Do Some Good

Sustainability and Social Responsibility seems to be ‘the thing’ at the moment, with lots of companies investing as much in their ‘green’ brand values as they do in their product and/or service ones.

However, it’s not very often that you come across campaigns which you think might actually DO something (and that don’t include pictures of wind turbines and dying polar bears!). So, it was with a slightly pessimistic mind that I downloaded and tried the new ‘Do Some Good’ mobile app developed by Orange (with a whole bunch of their charitable partner organisations) this week – but I loved it!

The idea of offering people ‘bite-sized’ volunteering opportunities which they can do from their phones and fit in at any time during their day, is great. The app itself is really simple to use, allowing  you to browse through the various tasks or choose from the type of activity you want to do – such as completing surveys which help charities to develop their messages, taking or uploading pictures which can be used royalty free by charitable organisations, locating and helping to ‘map’ outdoor spaces which people can enjoy and where kids can safely play, sharing an ‘urban oasis’ or even offering your language skills to help translate something useful.

The Orange Rockcorps Collective (the division behind this concept), will then reward you with music downloads or tickets to gigs once your ‘bite-sized’ activities add up to a total of 4 hours. Seems that The Collective also have a great website and Facebook page to showcase their mission and entice more people to join and share their volunteering experiences. No mention of the Do some Good app on there just yet, and no link to any other digital platforms from the app itself, but it’s early days and hopefully there will be more tie-ins further down the line.

I’ve already filled in a survey about my (non-existent) cycling habits and taken a few pics of the local beauty spots, so feel quite good about myself! You should give it a go!

2. Kotex – Ban the Bland

Crowdsourcing sanitary pad designs? This is where I lose my male readers……

Kotex have taken the brave step recently in the US to challenge the traditionally white and ‘sterile’ design of feminine hygiene products, and their latest campaign opens up the redesign to their consumers.

Using their online design tool, you can choose from various patterns, colours, brush effects and sizes, as well as various graphics – including the option to upload your own – to create either a pad or a tin design. Once you have completed your ‘masterpiece’ you can add it to the gallery where others can then ‘like’ your design (or not!). There is even the option to create a mood board for those who are really serious about winning the prize of designing the final products with leading fashion visionary, Patricia Field.

I’ve worked on a similar ‘design your own’ tool in the past, but for flooring, and know how difficult they can be to create – especially if they include an ‘upload your own image’ option and a gallery. It seems that Kotex have done a good job with theirs and it is fun to play around with.

It would have been good to see more of a link to social channels so that users could share their designs (and therefore the campaign) with their networks. Perhaps the option to replace your Facebook profile picture with your pad design? mmmm…on second thoughts,maybe not!

However, I did notice whilst looking into this that the Facebook page they run is actually really well managed even with the lack of a direct tie-in to their latest ‘push’. They do share the campaign – even if only via the wall – and respond quickly and intelligently to peoples questions and comments.

The campaign also includes a big investment in offline advertising, including TV, billboards and in-store, which is sure to drive people to the online tool. The brand are (not surprisingly) claiming interest so far has been very high.

3. Desperados – The Desperados Experience

I could not write my weekly round-up this week without including something about the amazing You Tube take-over by Desperados.

The Tequila-based alcohol brand have created an inspired interactive experience which asks the user to reveal their age (for legal reasons I guess), select if they want to party with men or women, and then invites them to ‘join the party’. You can then ‘break through the wall’ by using interactive ‘sliders’ in order to open out the standard video viewing area to a much larger and wilder ‘party’.

The TV ad version is below, but you really need to check out You Tube in order to see what a great job they have done of taking this concept and developing it for digital use. It no doubt involved detailing both offline and online requirements ahead of filming, in order to make use of the set, cast and props for all needs.

Good on them for thinking ahead! So many brands simply stick their TV ad on the web and expect it to work just as well and go viral, without truly thinking about the medium and planning ahead.

Out of interest, the brand also seem to be doing the ‘design by crowd’ thing on their website, where you can design your own bottle and accessories etc. Jumping on the crowdsourcing bandwagon? Why not!

This weeks digital campaign chatter #3


There were lots to choose from this week, but here are my pick of the most talked about digital marketing campaigns from the past 7 days.

(disclaimer – that doesn’t mean that I think they are the BEST campaigns, just that you will find them interesting!)

As always, if you want to receive a regular email of my weekly round-up, just subscribe to this blog (bottom of page) and join the gang!

1. BT – the 2nd biggest wedding of the year

Although this campaign idea is very cheesy, it has been executed nicely, the concept being that the long-running characters from BT’s TV ads – Adam & Jane – are getting married. Thanks to the early arrival of their baby, it seems that Jane needs some help with the organisation of the ‘big day’. Crowdsourcing? Well, kind of…..

Using their Facebook page as the main campaign platform, and some nicely produced videos, you can vote for your favourite dress, first dance song choice, or wedding car.

By taking part in the voting, the user could also win the chance to be there for the creation of the ‘wedding’ ad, due to be screened in April to coincide with…you guessed it….the Royals getting hitched. Riding on the back of the nations predicted wedding fever it seems!

It’s not the first time that BT have asked for the publics opinions on how this couples lives should develop – last year saw them use a similar campaign to decide if Jane should get pregnant or not. Both are good examples of integrated marketing across both online and offline platforms.

I still prefer the Gold Blend couple personally, but maybe that’s just an age thing!

2. Cadburys – Race Season

Cadbury’s latest campaign – Race Season – launched on 29th Feb, with a whopping overall investment of £6.5 million.

The integrated campaign includes TV and community events as well as digital, and encourages users to take part in everyday challenges in order to try to set new world records for how fast you can do them, as well as earn extra points for your team. Un-rolling a toilet roll, or making a bed are amongst the handful of fun tasks you can take part in. You can upload videos of your own attempts, and for certain challenges, such as ‘the fastest clicker’ actually take part in them online.

As part of their larger ‘Spots v Stripes’ initiative which kicked off early 2010, participants are asked to take sides before embarking on their challenge, and there are even separate Facebook groups set up for both teams to really get the competitive juices flowing!

The main site homepage displays which team is in the lead at any given time, giving you all sorts of opportunities and ways of pushing your team back in front should you have backed the losing side. Also cleverly enticing you to access the campaign more and more in order to make sure that you stay on top!

They obviously have the budget to put some serious online promotion behind the campaign, which was developed by Fallon, as well as pushing it via their TV ad spots. Great idea and execution though, and ties in really well with the run up to the London Olympics.

3. Coca-Cola – song inspired by fans

In an attempt to get more in touch with teen consumers and hit their 2020 company vision of more than doubling their revenue to $200 billion globally, Coca-Cola have hooked up with  Maroon5 to create a campaign which will see users help the band to write and create a new song within a 24hr period on March 22nd.

Whilst driven by the main microsite, the campaign also has very strong links with both Facebook and Twitter, starting by sending event invitations out to their 22million plus Facebook fans –  a really obvious and simple thing to do, but something which is often forgotten about.

Participants will be able to help inspire the band during the day, by sending them photos, lyrics, comments etc., resulting in a song which will later be ‘shared with the World’.

This campaign spearheads the new music initiative – Coca-Cola Music – again, aimed at the teen market, which will allow fans to see more behind-the-scenes info on the creation of music, as well as access to view leading artists at work.

4. Nursery  & Garden Industry of Australia – Plant/Life Balance

This is a great campaign for the Nursery & Garden Industry of Australia, which began with them giving away 20,000 plants at major train stations across the country to kick things off, and has been getting lots of thumbs up from digital marketing bods around the World over the past couple of weeks.

The nicely designed Facebook app lets you match yourself with the perfect plant for you, teaches you  how to take care of it in a fun and engaging way, and encourages you via competitions, content and interaction to take part in a 12-week challenge. Your plant will even get its own Facebook page! Love it.

Toyota crowdsourcing ideas for good


(Yet another post on a car brand…this in turning into a trend!)

It’s no secret, given all the trouble they had with the Prius last year, that Toyota needed to do some serious work on their PR and branding, and I think their Ideas For Good campaign is a great start.

The technologies which go into developing their cars far surpass other industries. In the past they have shared these ideas and innovations with others, including universities and hospitals, but via this campaign they are now asking the public for ideas on how their technology could be used ‘for good’.

From November 2010 when the campaign was initially launched, people could upload their ideas via a simple but nicely designed microsite, in the hope of winning the prize of working with Toyota to develop their idea further….oh, and choosing one of Toyota’s cars for themselves too!

Submissions are now closed, but you can still show your support by voting on your favourite idea. Finalists will be announced on the 10th April and people will be asked to vote on which they prefer up until the end of the month. The winner will then be announced on the 6th May.

I really love the idea behind this campaign, and the fact that it has given Toyota a chance to showcase how their innovations have helped others and their involvement with the wider community, so I’m a little surprised that they have not done a better job at promotion. There are hardly any votes on the ideas, which in my view is a sure sign of poor marketing around the campaign. There is also no mention of it on Facebook. Could be because the submission date has passed, but surely whilst still in the period of voting on finalists, now should be the time they are pushing this more than ever?

On a positive note, I do quite like the ‘Auto-Biographies’ which they DO have on their Facebook page, which allows people to upload their car stories, and in some cases have them animated. They are also due to launch a campaign on the 7th March which will give 100 cars to 100 do-gooders over 100 days, again voted for by the public. Another great crowdsourcing idea, lets hope that they do a better job of promoting it!